5 tips to help you grow your own

5 tips to help you grow your own


Posted 10th April by Peter Byrne

There's a new phenomenon moving across the UK - say goodbye to DIY and get ready to welcome in grow it yourself (GIY)!

Inspired by the warmer weather, Brits are starting to reveal their horticultural side - but they're not only focusing on flowers and foliage. Instead, we're looking to grow our own produce, with eBay.co.uk revealing searches for vegetable seeds and trays have risen by 53 per cent and 32 per cent respectively since February 2019, when compared to the same spell last year.

The same period also saw searches for lawn mowers increase by 47 per cent, as Brits tried to get on top of their gardens following a winter of neglect.

Now that spring is upon us, it's the ideal time to plant herbs and vegetables. If you’re not sure where to begin with GIY, Thompson & Morgan, top gardening seller on eBay.co.uk, are sharing their tips...

1. Don't let size put you off

If you lack the space for a garden bed, you could always try growing produce in window boxes, pots or grow bags. All you need to ensure is that they're big enough, so that the vegetable roots won't be cramped or at risk of drying out in the sun. You want a sheltered, sunny spot for them to grow, so buy pots that you can move around without difficulty.

2. You are what you eat

Make sure your plants get the necessary nutrients to grow produce - a key component here is adding a quality compost. Take the time and money to invest in a good compost, and you're bound to reap the rewards.

3. Good foundations

You want your seedlings to grow undercover or indoors, so you don't risk having them eaten by animals or insects before they're fully grown. When it comes down to it, the only plants you will not be able to transplant are root crops like carrots. These plants don't like their roots being disturbed, and subsequently need growing in situ.

4. Hydration

Look into how much hydration your plants will need. If you grow beans, you want to ensure you don't water them too much - this encourages leafy growth and limits your produce. In comparison, tomatoes require more watering to help them establish.

5. Pest protection

You have a couple of choices here. You could try companion planting, which sees you plant different herbs next to your vegetables - each one wards off a different pest. For instance, nasturtiums ward off beetles from cucumbers, while planting corn with beans means leafhoppers and armyworms are kept at bay.

Another option is to use garden netting, or alternatively, how about a pop-up greenhouse? This can then be zipped up to ward off pets.






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