How your New Year's Resolutions can help you to get your dream interiors

How your New Year's Resolutions can help you to get your dream interiors


Posted 8th January

If you've made New Year's Resolutions in the past but have struggled to maintain them, these tips from celebrity life coach and relationship expert, Sloan Sheridan-Williams, could be just what you need to help you stick with them

What’s the best way to stick to a New Year’s Resolution?

Your brain is not automatically wired to succeed at sticking to resolutions any more than your muscles are automatically wired to succeed at running a marathon, yet every year people ask their brain to perform the mental equivalent.

Here are my five top tips to stick to a New Year's Resolution:

1. Announce your resolution to friends and family so you hold yourself accountable to others and not just yourself.
2. Identify the limiting beliefs which hold you back and don't take your past into your future.
3. Break down your resolution into smaller manageable daily habits you can more easily stick to.
4. Steer clear of triggers which might steer you off course.
5. Don't give up at the first wrong turn. A setback simply helps you learn what works for you and what doesn't.

Can you have too many resolutions? How do you go about choosing which ones to prioritise?

The number of resolutions that work for people will be an individual preference. Some people prefer to commit to just 1, with no room for flexibility, whereas others benefit from between 3 and 5 resolutions. The Life MOT is a unique 1-2-1 coaching session I've designed in partnership with Honda to help people turbocharge the start of 2019. One of the action plans in the Life MOT is a list of 101 things the person would like to do by the end of the year. This exercise helps people open their minds up to options and possibilities which they may have otherwise thought were unavailable to them, allowing them to prioritise the things which will be the most rewarding in terms of self-fulfilment.

If you want to resolve to keep your house tidier/neater/etc in 2019, what’s the best way to begin?

If you feel overwhelmed and your budget allows, it's beneficial to outsource cleaning to a professional. If you want to minimise cost then it's best to break housekeeping down into smaller helpful habits which you can do on a daily basis or once a week. Breaking things down into manageable chunks avoids setting yourself up for failure by taking on too much at once. A great place to start is to tidy just one room in your house so that everything important has a place of its own and the rest is either stored away, thrown out or donated to charity. Once you've felt the sense of satisfaction and achievement from tidying one room, this will motivate you to continue with other rooms in the house over the following days and weeks.

In your opinion, what are the pros of resolving to keep your home tidier/neater?

There is the old adage that a tidy house is a tidy mind. Although some people do well amongst clutter, there is a sense of accomplishment to decluttering your home. In addition, training your brain to throw things away physically gives your brain permission to let go of emotional baggage. Rather than just tidying one's space, you should also focus on the more creative side of homemaking. There is a wealth of upcycling advice, blogs and articles on revamping your home and hundreds of YouTube videos which can trigger creativity and bring the right mixture of calmness and excitement to keep your home tidy rather than the negative emotions that can accompany a messy house.

When it comes to resolving to commit to a big change in the home (for example, making 2019 the year you finally redecorate, or invest in a new kitchen suite, or etc), what’s the best and most stress-free way to get the ball rolling, without scaring yourself or being putting off?

As I mention in my book, Slap Fear In The Face, being out of your comfort zone is often the most beneficial place to be if you want personal growth. There have been functional MRI studies that show as soon as you take even just one small step towards something you fear, your threat centres go from being on alert to allowing your more logical brain to assess the reality of the originally perceived threat. For example when you skydive, you often fear the initial jump but even beginners love the free fall which is what many worry about. Taking a small step like buying the first lot of paint and testing it on the wall or putting the deposit down on your kitchen will help to get the ball rolling and slap fear out of the way of you achieving your dream house.


Image courtesy of Honda Life MOT

Honda has partnered with life coach to the stars, Sloan Sheridan-Williams, to launch the ‘Life MOT’ – a unique life coaching session when you test drive a Civic this January. Designed to help Brits take a different route in 2019, the sessions will be available at selected Honda dealerships across the UK. The initiative comes as research reveals that only a quarter of Brits will be setting New Year resolutions for 2019. Despite the best of intentions, it seems that Brits are already preparing themselves for failure, with one in ten admitting they don’t stick to their New Year resolutions beyond January, whilst one in five will keep their goals secret to minimise the pressure if they fail to stick to them.

To register to drive a Honda Civic and receive a Life MOT with Sloan Sheridan-Williams this January, visit their website https://www.hondaengineroom.co.uk/cars/lifeMOT/. Spots are subject to availability. Participating dealerships include London, Bristol and Newcastle.






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