The seven stages to sprucing up your outdoor wooden furniture

The seven stages to sprucing up your outdoor wooden furniture


Posted 6th Jul 2018 by Peter Byrne

If you have some worn out old outdoor wooden furniture, don’t rush out to buy a new collection – instead, give your old set a spruce up

To set you on your way, the garden experts at BillyOh.com have compiled a list of some of the most cost-effective yet also incredibly efficient methods to revive your old pieces – saving you a fair bit in the process too.

All you need to do is set aside a few hours for some hard graft and get a couple of affordable tools to help! 

The seven steps are:

1 Start by washing your garden furniture with warm, soapy water.

2 Now, you need to disassemble the furniture as much as you can. Make sure you clearly mark out each part, so you will know how to fit it back together afterwards.

3 Then, give your furniture a quick once over with a sanding machine. To get into the more difficult areas, fold and scrunch up a sheet of sandpaper. If there are any rounded areas, use sanding sponges with a buffing action and try to sand along the grain, even if the wood slats change direction. Keep doing this until you expose fresh, new wood.

4 When the furniture has been fully sanded down, wipe it down with a dry cloth before using a vacuum cleaner nozzle to get the remains of the dust off. Ensure the dust that is deep in the grain is off, so it will not interfere with the finishing.

5 Use a quality exterior oil that has been specifically designed for the material your furniture is made from (for instance, oak or teak). On the first coat, you want to soak the raw wood with plenty of oil, using a rag on the flat areas along with a brush to access the tight areas.

6 Allow the furniture to completely dry before you scuff it lightly with 320 grit sand paper. Wipe and vacuum off any scuffed dust before you apply a second coat of oil with a foam brush. This then provides a smoother coat and leaves fewer brush marks.

7 You will ideally want to get as many coats of oil on the furniture as you possibly can. This means you will only have to repeat this process every few years, instead of on a more regular basis.





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